Coordinator: Timothy Bredy, University of Queensland, Australia

John Mattick, Genomics England, London, UK

Kate Meyer, Duke University, Durham, USA

Chuan He, University of Chicago, USA

Howard Y. Chang, Stanford University, USA

Dan Ohtan Wang, Kyoto University, USA

Jason Shepherd, University of Utah, USA

Activity-induced RNA expression is highly dynamic and linked to experience-dependent plasticity in the brain. In neurons, changes in the metabolic state of RNA occur on similar time scales to those for neuronal firing and depolarization, and a variety of factors including chemical modifications to RNA as well as RNA structure, editing and localization play a role. These processes have a profound impact on mRNA as well as the many classes noncoding RNA that are expressed in a temporally- and cell-type-specific, manner in the brain.

Emerging findings suggest that these epitranscriptomic mechanisms represent an elusive hidden layer of regulatory control in the brain that is intimately involved in the molecular transactions underlying learning and memory. In this course, participants will acquire a deeper understanding of how qualitative state changes in RNA can increase the functional diversity and information-carrying capacity of RNA molecules. Advances in the understanding of the epitranscriptome and emerging technologies that can be used to unravel the complex nature of experience-dependent gene regulation in the brain will be discussed.

About RNA, Epitranscrioptomics and Plasticity Advanced Course

• Activity-induced RNA expression: links to experience-dependent plasticity in the brain
• Role of RNA structure, editing and localization
• Epitranscriptomic mechanisms: an elusive hidden layer of regulatory control in the brain
• Qualitative state changes in RNA and increase in the functional diversity and information-carrying capacity of RNA molecules
• Emerging technologies to unravel experience-dependent gene regulation in the brain

Venue

Island of San Servolo
30124 Venice - Italy